Discussion started by Roland Talanow 8 years ago
A provocative question! What is YOUR opinion about how much a medical student should know about Radiology and should be taught in medical school.
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Sumer Sethi
Sumer Sethi
" Integrating knowledge of anatomy and function into medical imaging for the most common diseases seen in the clinical setting must be emphasized." is well said !!
8 years ago
ronald j. de castro
ronald j. de castro
I think a medical student must have some basic idea regarding how anatomy is depicted across all imaging modalities. He/ she must know the strengths and limitations of the different modalities. This knowledge will allow him/ her to choose which modality is best for a particular patient and for a particular disease and even for a peculiar circumstance. Integrating their knowledge of anatomy and function into medical imaging for the most common diseases seen in the clinical setting must be emphasized.
8 years ago
Roland Talanow
Roland Talanow
I think (at least in my personal experience) the medical student - who will be soon on his first night call - should be able to interpret critical findings by himself, without the need to wait (up to hours) for the official radiologist's read. Speaking: acute cranial bleed, strike, pneumothorax, small bowel obstruction/perforation. Things, which need immediate action. I agree, that there is no need to know more sophisticated and non-emergent findings such as tumor appearance on different MR sequences - that should be still our job as radiologist (and will).
8 years ago
Sumer Sethi
Sumer Sethi
if i sum them up-

Syllabus should be----
Basic knowledge of Radiological anatomy
Intrepretation of CXR or CT pertinent to Emergency
Benefits and risks of various modlities
Economics involved

any more??

8 years ago
Lionel Cheng
Lionel Cheng
From what I have seen, radiological images are playing a much bigger role in medical student education now. I think a new generation of medical students will soon arrive who have learnt anatomy and pathology through CT and MRI images. One challenge is that the education system has to predict what professional life will be like about 7 - 10 years down the road, which is a difficult task.

I agree with what has been posted so far. Med Students should learn a few important and critical findings across modalities, as they will find themselves looking at a CXR or CT head while on call at night sometime in the future. However, complex analysis of the differential diagnoses of various tumors in different MRI sequences does not need to be taught, as they will not be able to retain such knowledge, and it will consume time which is better used to show them more relevant things about radiology.

Also, I feel that they should be exposed to what the different tests entail. For example, they should see how a CT/MRI scan is performed, the challenges faced by patients with claustrophobia/movement difficulties, and what a contrast swallow/enema is like.

Also, there should be time spent on educating them about cost-benefit issues, potential 'abuse' of imaging, and definitely some basics about radiation risks.
8 years ago
Francisco Sendra
Francisco Sendra
A medical student is a future general doctor able to be an specialist. They need to know anatomy (and function) as they will find it in the clinical scenario, radiology images including the variability of patients (sex, age, morphology, normal variants...). Anatomy teaching must be strongly based on diagnostic images. Classical anatomy teaching (cadaver dissections, draws and schemes) is a good point of departure but ...in other words, I find inexcusable for a general physician do not be able to find the gallbladder or the pancreas in a CT. In my experience, students of third course, with a large contents of anatomy approved do not use to do it and we have to re-teach anatomy as it appears in radiology images..
To understand why anatomy and diseases are seen with determinate aspects, students need to know basics of any diagnostic modality frequently used in the medical practice (XR, CT, MRI, ultrasonography,...). This will lead also to the understanding of general indications, limits and cost effectivenes.

I agree with you Melike, students also need contents about basic semiology, signs in radiology, what they mean and what is their utility.
It is not only my opinion, undergraduate teaching of radiology does not match the real role of radiology in medicine.
8 years ago
Melike Guryildirim
Melike Guryildirim
In my opinion, some basic knowledge about reading x-rays should be taught. A medical student "should" recognize pneumothorax, cardiomegaly, pleural effusin, mediastinal shift, free air under the diaphragm, air- fluid levels in the intestines, compresion fractures, etc. Physics of the radiological imaging techniques also should be discussed in a simple way. Information beyond that is destined to be forgotten if our future doctor doesn't become a radiologist. I read approximately 100 x- rays daily since 4 months, yet I don't know much, so I can't imagine how thorougly a medical student can learn radiology.

At the end, it all depends on personal effort..Not everything can be taught, sometimes the student has to pursue information on his/her own...
8 years ago

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